Mission #1: The Power of The Blog

Wow, wow, wow, wow, wow. Sam Shah here, and I’m beyond floored by how many people are interested in participating in Exploring the MTBoS. Floored, and overjoyed.

wowie

[this was a picture from my birthday, but I pretty much look like this all the time]

I honestly thought we’d find a few people out there who were interested in this beautiful, amazing group of math teachers — and BAM! There are a zillion of you, from all over, teaching all sorts of different things, all with differing experiences with blogs and twitter. I can’t tell you how much my heart swelled when I was reading through all the comments of people who signed up. I’m in heaven.

Now let’s see if we can’t make this worthwhile for you.

Almost all of you have read a few math teacher blogs — and that’s what brought you here. So we thought we’d center the first week around blogging… Each week a different one of us (Sam Shah, Tina Cardone, Justin Lanier, and Julie Reulbach) are going to be leading up a mission. This week (obviously) is my week.

So let’s go! Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start.

Mission #1: The Power of The Blog

For this Explore the MathTwitterBlogosphere program, you’re going to be doing a bunch of different challenges. Each of them is going to end with you doing a little reflection related to what you did. Thus, it’s important (at least for these few weeks) to have a blog to write on. Although we are going to be asking you to keep a blog for these 8 weeks, we are not going to be making you continue it. If you know me, you know that my current mantra about this online community is “There’s no right way to participate in this weird disjointed passionate community. Do what moves you. Do what makes sense for you.”

Part of this experience going outside of your comfort zone and exploring various things to see if any of them will prove useful for you. So try out keeping and writing in this blog for the next few weeks and see how it goes. If it turns out you find it useful and want to continue posting regularly, great. If not, that’s just as great. You have to do what’s useful for you! That being said…

We have two different missions for you, depending on if you have a blog or if you don’t.

If you don’t have a blog, look for the section of this post titled “ACK! I need a blog! Stat!” and only read that. Just skip to that part. Like now! GO!

If you already have a blog, look immediately below to find the section titled “I have a blog… Now what, Mister?!” 

I have a blog… Now what, Mister?!

Your mission is threefold.

1. You are going to write a blogpost on one of the following two prompts.

  • What is one of your favorite open-ended/rich problems?  How do you use it in your classroom? (If you have a problem you have been wanting to try, but haven’t had the courage or opportunity to try it out yet, write about how you would or will use the problem in your classroom.)

  • What is one thing that happens in your classroom that makes it distinctly yours? It can be something you do that is unique in your school… It can be something more amorphous… However you want to interpret the question! Whatever!

Just pick one prompt and post about it!

<rant> Now some part of you might be thinking: my rich problem isn’t rich enough! I’m embarrassed by it! I am new to teaching — so my classroom isn’t really distinctly mine yet. So I don’t have a perfect answer to the prompts! If that happens to you, just write about something similar. But I said this last year when getting people to write their first post: If you feel like you aren’t awesome at teaching, welcome to the club. If you feel constantly like everything else you see out there is better, welcome to the club. So if you’re new to teaching and have material that you’re proud of it, post it! We’re all starting this at different points, but the one thing I’ve learned is that I can steal ideas or be inspired or commiserate with first year teachers as easily as a veteran teacher. So try not to be self-conscious and obsessive. We’re all here to reflect on what we do, and to learn from each other. We’re not trying to be the best and we’re not out to impress each other. We’re out to get better. No one in the mathtwitterblogosphere is judging you, but yourself. So if you’re a sucky writer, own it and don’t worry about not being Tolstoy. If you feel like what you want to write has already been said on a lot of other places, write it anyway. This is you, for you, by you. Phew. </rant> 

2. You are going to write a comment on this blogpost. Your comment will say:

Your name (or pseudonym, if you’re using one)
Your Twitter handle (if you have one)
Your blog name
The title of your post
The URL of your post
One (or two) sentences from your post to capture a reader’s interest

Example:
My name is Sam Shah (@samjshah) and I’m blogging at _Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere_. The title of my blogpost is “Senior Letters 2012” (http://samjshah.com/2012/05/31/senior-letter-2012/).

To whet your appetite: “Each year at the end of the school year, I say goodbye to my seniors. And each year, I’ve written a letter to the seniors with some imparting thoughts as they go off in the world.”

3. Once you’ve posted your comment advertising your blogpost, look at the three previous comments (the ones above yours). Read the posts of these three people and write a comment each of their blogs! If you are one of those eager beavers who are the first three to post, just find three comments as people begin to post!

Seriously, that’s it for this week for you! Trust us — we’re going to have more in the coming weeks. But we’re starting with the basics!

ACK! I need a blog! Stat!

You made it here! Phew! Now for your mission. Your mission has a few parts… but don’t be daunted…

1. Come up with a blog title. It can be funny, it can be serious, it can make no sense, whatever. However, my one admonition: don’t spend more than 10 minutes coming up with this blog title. The more you struggle to choose it, the more annoying it is going to be, and I’m afraid you’re going to use this hassle of coming up with a blog title to be enough to stop you from blogging. This cannot happen. Not on my watch! So 10 minutes is all you have.

2. Start a blog. If you have no idea how to do this, go to my favorite blogging site wordpress.com and get a blog! Here’s an awesome two minute video showing the process.


The link is here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N0zXEwtjCI

3. Write a short blogpost on one of the following prompts. Yup, you’re already ready to go. See how easy setting up a blog was? EASY!:

  • Who are you? Introduce yourself to the MathTwitterBlogosphere! How’d you get into teaching? What do you like most about your job?
  • What is one of your favorite open-ended/rich problems?  How do you use it in your classroom? (If you have a problem you have been wanting to try, but haven’t had the courage or opportunity to try it out yet, write about how you would or will use the problem in your classroom.)

  • What is one thing that happens in your classroom that makes it distinctly yours? It can be something you do that is unique in your school… It can be something more amorphous… However you want to interpret the question! Whatever!
  • What brought you to the MTBoS? What do you hope to get out of participating in the #MTBoS?

I suppose it can be a long blogpost too. Whatever floats your boat. If you’re adventurous, bonus points (okay, there aren’t really points) and twenty unicorn rainbows (there are real, however!) if you include an image or a video or a link.

<rant> Now some part of you might be thinking: my rich problem isn’t rich enough! I’m embarrassed by it! I am new to teaching — so my classroom isn’t really distinctly mine yet. So I don’t have a perfect answer to the prompts! If that happens to you, just write about something similar. But I said this last year when getting people to write their first post: If you feel like you aren’t awesome at teaching, welcome to the club. If you feel constantly like everything else you see out there is better, welcome to the club. So if you’re new to teaching and have material that you’re proud of it, post it! We’re all starting this at different points, but the one thing I’ve learned is that I can steal ideas or be inspired or commiserate with first year teachers as easily as a veteran teacher. So try not to be self-conscious and obsessive. We’re all here to reflect on what we do, and to learn from each other. We’re not trying to be the best and we’re not out to impress each other. We’re out to get better. No one in the mathtwitterblogosphere is judging you, but yourself. So if you’re a sucky writer, own it and don’t worry about not being Tolstoy. If you feel like what you want to write has already been said on a lot of other places, write it anyway. This is you, for you, by you. Phew. </rant>

4. You are going to write a comment on this blogpost. Your comment will say:

Your name (or pseudonym, if you’re using one)
Your Twitter handle (if you have one)
Your blog name
The title of your post
The URL of your post
One (or two) sentences from your post to capture a reader’s interest

Example:
My name is Sam Shah (@samjshah) and I’m blogging at _Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere_. The title of my blogpost is “Senior Letters 2012” (http://samjshah.com/2012/05/31/senior-letter-2012/).

To whet your appetite: “Each year at the end of the school year, I say goodbye to my seniors. And each year, I’ve written a letter to the seniors with some imparting thoughts as they go off in the world.”

5. Once you’ve posted your comment advertising your blogpost, look at the three previous comments (the ones above yours). Read the posts of these three people and write a comment each of their blogs! If you are one of those eager beavers who are the first three to post, just find three comments as people begin to post!

We know this is a lot, asking you: hey, start a blog. But you did it! And you’re going to try it out! And for that, we are proud mama and papa bears! You are awesomesauce!

** Also, please be sure to comment on other bloggers posts on THEIR blogs instead of here.  Everyone loves getting comments on their blogs! 

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289 thoughts on “Mission #1: The Power of The Blog

  1. Hi I’m Jemma (@JemmaPDuck)
    I have set up my blog here: http://jemmapduck.wordpress.com/
    it is called “One wee duck’s waddle through the maths world…”

    My first blog post is called “Exploring the MathTwitterBlogosphere”
    which is here: http://jemmapduck.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/exploring-the-mathtwitterblogosphere/

    To whet your appetite: “I have set up this blog today as a mission from the MathTwitterBlogosphere which I have signed up for due to my compulsive strive to get better as a teacher. I won’t deny that I’ve enjoyed this experience, like most Mathemagicians I only use letters in expressions and equations – not for formulating long sentences for people to read.”

  2. Better late than never, right?!
    I’m Nicole Paris, and my blog is at orangamallows.blogspot.com
    I occasionally tweet as @solvingforx, and teach 7th grade math in Maryland
    This week I shared a task based on the Painted Cube ” I wanted to really get students asking the questions so I created the following models and let students decide what we were trying to find out.”
    Looking forward to checking out all of the great blogs above!

  3. My name is Doreen Brady, and I’m a seventh grade math teacher. My first blog post is titled “Writing and Math.” You can find it at http://doreenbrady.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/writing-and-math/

    I taught English for four years. When I switched to teaching math last year, I found that I really missed reading my students’ journals. In this blog entry I ramble on a bit about trying journal writing in my math classes this year. I’ve included three writing prompts that have worked really well for me.

  4. I’m Hannah and my blog is http://penseesdemath.wordpress.com. I teach grade 11 and 12 math mostly with a bit of high school French on the side…
    Twitter: @hannahbergsma
    This week, I just wrote an introduction to myself and why I’m excited to join this community!

  5. I’m Susan Meisels and I blog at Midpoint Perspective. The title of my blogpost is Board Practice (http://midpointperspective.blogspot.ca/2013/10/board-practice.html).

    My students work in groups, and have been since the beginning of time. Since before it was a thing. I’ve always asked my students to talk, share and coach. I think it may come from my teacher beginning as a science teacher, and my love of labs. I’ve carried this forward to my math classes.

  6. I’m Andy Zsiga, and I blog at Zsigywithit. The title of my blogpost is A favorite (http://zsigywithit.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/a-favorite/)
    Twitter: @zsiga_andy

    Box and whisker plots have been an enemy of mine through out my years of teaching. I just cannot find how they are relevant enough to teach to all students.

  7. My name is Robert Paris and I am a Geometry teacher in Jackson, MS. I blog at “Mr. Paris: Teaching a Little, Learning a Lot.”
    Here’s my post: MTBoS #1: Giving in, and Diving in
    http://rparis315.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/exploring-mtbos-1/

    I started all my Geometry classes off this year with the problem “Four 4s to 100.” The goal is to use only the number 4 four times (no more, no less) and any operation to calculate the numbers 1 through 100. For example, 4 – 4 + 4/4 = 1.

  8. Hi everybody! My name John Mahlstedt and I teach middle school math.
    I’m on twitter at @jdmahlstedt and my blog is called What is 5?

    My first post is titled “What is 5?” and it explores this question, which I present to my classes at the very beginning of each year to set the tone in our classroom, and confuse the heck out of the students! Check it out here:
    http://jdmahlstedt.wordpress.com/wp-admin/customize.php

  9. I am Tina Palmer, novice to blogs: it took me over half an hour to find where to post a comment! The word Reply through me for a loop, so I am hoping this is the right place!

    I teach all grades 9-12 at a vocational school and absolutely love my job. On Twitter you can find me @TPalmer207. My blog is Palmer’s Ponderings http://palmersponderings207.blogspot.com/

    If you have read The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz, then you may recognize the four rules for my classroom that hang above the window. The title of the post is Four = Eight (almost).
    http://palmersponderings207.blogspot.com/2013_10_01_archive.html

  10. My name is Narcesa Vaughn. I am a middle/high school math teacher. My first blog is titled “Distinctly Mine.” It can be found at http://narcesav.wordpress.com

    Distinctly mine…I work at a residential facility so I have a unique relationship with my students. Close? Yes, we are.

  11. My name is John O’Malley and I am blogging at Functions Are Fun.

    I have my geometry students practice their angle vocab with transversals in this fun and engaging activity in this post titled “Low Effort + High Engagement = Awesome Angles Activity”.

    You can check it out here: http://functionsarefun.wordpress.com/2013/10/11/mission-1-low-effort-high-engagement-awesome-angles-activity/

    Hope to see you around and I can’t wait to read a lot more great blogs this year!

  12. My, name is Sarah Martin. I teach 7th grade math in Shenandoah, Iowa. This is my first blog post. You can find it at : http://mathisajourney.wordpress.com

  13. My name is Amy Wix (awix22@twitter) and I’ve started blogging at “My Pile of Rocks”. The title of my post is MTBoS Week 1 Challenge Favorite Problem. http://6thgraderockpile.blogspot.com
    I love posing the locker problem to my 6th grade students.

  14. Hi, my name is Pam Rissmann, and I am blogging at http://pperfectsquares.wordpress.com . The title of my post for Mission#1 is “What makes my classroom uniquely mine? My ears.” : http://pperfectsquares.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/what-makes-my-classroom-uniquely-mine-my-ears/

    My post includes some examples of how students share their ideas about math in my class, and how I try to listen. Really.

  15. My name is Heather and I’m blogging at Pi For Hungry Minds. The title of my post is “Write your own test” (http://piforhungryminds.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/write-your-own-test/)

    A teaser:
    “I decided to have them each write an end of topic test…. There were grumbles. There were complaints. There were comments that “this is stupid”.

    But did they learn from it? Yes. Absolutely.”

  16. My name is Marsha Foshee (@marshafoshee) and I teach high school in southeastern Illinois in a school of approximately 550 students. In my most recent post (http://math-termind.blogspot.com/2013/10/what-sets-me-apart.html) at math-termind.blogspot.com I detail how I am different than other members of my department.

  17. Name: Taoufik Nadji
    Twitter Handle: @MrLeNadj
    Blog Name: Math Coolisms
    Title of My Post: Clickerisms & Conceptual Understanding of Mathematical Ideas
    URL of My Post: http://mathcoolisms.blogspot.com/2013/10/mtbos-mission-1-blog-post-clickerisms.html
    Post Description: Using Clickerisms [conceptual questions that are answered via clickers] as formative assessment tools that would ensure deeper and firmer conceptual understanding of mathematical concepts.

  18. I’m Leigh Nataro (@mathteacher24) and I finally got around to positing for the first of these 8 blog challenges. My blog is called “Mathematical Musings by mathteacher24” and it can be found at mathteacher24.blogspot.com.

    The title of my blog for this posting is “Mrs. Nataro’s Postulates of Learning.” I have created 5 sentences that describe what I think is key to learning mathematics. They have shaped who I am as a teacher and guide what happens in my classroom.

  19. My name is Laura and I just started my first blog at smilinginrm35.wordpress.com. You can read my first post at http://smilinginrm35.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/my-first-post-my-first-mission/. Why did I name my blog “Smiling in Rm 35”? Because I smile when I do or think about math and the kids know to watch out!

  20. My name is Karen Hyma (@KarenACmath) and I am blogging at MadAboutMath. The title of my blogpost is “Do the students rule the roost?”(http:Karenhyma.wordpress.com). What makes my classroom unique in my building: I briefly describe how my goal for a student-led classroom has been met.

  21. Howard (@mathmtcs). I blog at blogspot with URL http://mathmtcs.blogspot.com. My blog is titled “mathmtcs” (are you noticing a pattern yet?) and my post for this assignment is “Assignment from ExploringTheMathTwitterBlogosphere #1” which you may find at http://mathmtcs.blogspot.com/2013/10/assignment-from-exploringthemathtwitter.html

    My post is not very long, so if I were to give one or two sentences here, there’d be no point in going to the blog itself.

  22. My name is Mardalee Burwitz @mburwitz. I’m blogging at mburwitzwahoo.wordpress.com

    The title of my blogpost is “ok….meet Aunt Sally”. I teach eighth graders and like to createwYs to keep the students involved in math along with some humor thrown in. I’m socurious how this blogging will go and all there is to learn from you all as well

  23. My name is Jeremy Loukas – @jloukas – and I am blogging at Making Math Work. My post today is Storytelling in the Classroom at http://makingmathwork.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/storytelling-in-my-classroom/

    I am usually not one to talk about a negative aspect of my classroom, but there is something that makes my classroom unique and great that is also holding me back as a leader.

  24. Hi, I’m Jered. Because of my last name I’ve graciously accepted the nickname “Daddy Ratty,” and lots of my students and coworkers simply call me “Rat Daddy.” It’s cool. I’m on Twitter (@ratsmaths), have just started my teaching blog (ratsmaths.wordpress.com), and my first post is Not my first, but my first here to share that it’s not my entry into the blogosphere, but it is my first post on a blog that’s professional in nature.

    An excerpt …
    ”I can’t explain it, I just know it,” to which I reply “I’m not convinced. Why don’t you visit with your group and I’ll come back by in a few minutes …”

  25. I’m Wendy Markert (@wjmarkert) and I’m blogging at _Left Handed Math_. The title of my blogpost is “Cornell Notes in a Flipped Math Class” (http://www.coetail.com/wjmarkert/2013/10/13/cornell-notes-in-a-flipped-math-class/).

    To whet your appetite: “I love how it has generated conversations about math and that they are using math terms in these conversations.”

  26. I’m Lois Burke (@lbburke) and my blog is at http://www.geekymathteacher.com
    I wasn’t very creative with my post name “Exploring the MTBoS”
    http://geekymathteacher.com/2013/10/exploring-mtbos/
    I wrote some about my classroom and how it’s uniquely me! I like a friendly, creative place so I talked about my classroom decorations and creations. I double dipped a bit and submitted a Made4Math project too!.
    Enjoy!

  27. I’m Pari Ford (@pfordne) and I created a blog at unkmathprof.wordpress.com. The title of my first blogpost is “Let’s Think about Math.” It is my thoughts on my mission to encourage my college students to think about math beyond the “recipe to the get the answer.”

  28. Hi, I’m Courtney from thenumbertwentyone.wordpress.com. I teach 7th grade math. @csteketee21

    You will have to excuse my quick post typed one handed from my phone while feeding a baby, but that’s all you get right now 🙂 It is all about Socratic Circles. http://thenumbertwentyone.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/explore-mtbos-socratic-circles/

  29. Name: Erika Fisher Twitter: @ejtf25
    Blog: School of Fisher Post: Backyard Ice Rink
    http://schooloffisher.blogspot.com/2013/10/backyard-ice-rink.html
    Have you ever wondered how many hours it takes to flood a backyard ice rink? Check out this amazingly rich problem. This year I teach Algebra 2 and Geometry to 9th graders in Minnesota.

  30. Hi I am Sangeeta Gulati and I posted on my blog mydynamicmathclass.wordpress.com for the first time today.I wrote the post “inspired by the Mathblogosphere” (http://wp.me/p3ZbRX-3) and shared the practice of using photographs of the work( mostly mistakes!) to help the students learn from their mistakes.This practice is inspired by the work of Michael Pershan, a high school math teacher from NYC.(mathmistakes.org)
    This also speaks of the power of Blogosphere…a teacher in India is taking inspiration from a teacher in NYC!!

  31. Mrs. Webbs
    No twitter yet 😦
    Deep Thoughts by Mrs. Webbs
    My classroom, distinctly mine
    http://mrswebbs.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/my-classroom-distinctly-mine/
    My students hate when I do this, but they learn that I’m more interested in the way they think that a final answer.

  32. Justin Aion
    @justinaion
    My blog is Relearning To Teach
    “What Makes Mr. Aion’s Class Different?”
    http://relearningtoteach.blogspot.com/2013/10/what-makes-mr-aions-class-different.html
    I had no idea how to answer this question. So I asked my students to answer it for me.

  33. LisaSolt
    Twitter handle @lisasolt
    My blog is Check Your Work, and my post “What Makes My Classroom Distinctly Mine” (creative I know) can be found here: http://checkyourwork.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/what-makes-my-classroom-distinctly-mine/
    I wrote about how I am trying to get students to believe that I believe in a “growth mindset.”

  34. Lisa Bejarano, @lisabej_manitou, My Blog is crazymathteacherlady, my post is (creatively) titled: My “Explore The MTBoS” Homework and can be found at http://crazymathteacherlady.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/my-explore-the-mtbos-homework/
    “That’s all I tell them. If they ask for help, I ask how many noses they have in their arm. They look mad, then confused, then they get to work.”

  35. Bridget Kapala @gidgbridge My second attempt at a blog is mathpotatoes and the title of my post today is “Here we go again…” http://gidgebridge.wordpress.com/ I do solemnly swear to comment more on blogger’s posts and give thanks.

  36. Zachary Goldman
    blog: HavingNewEyes.com
    My post: http://havingneweyes.com/2013/10/13/exploringthemathtwitterblogosphere/

    “I am no longer in the classroom as a math teacher, but I’ll participate anyway!”

    My post explores my role in a school-based non-profit and how I will work to support my team to use more rich questions and to identify what makes their work within the schools uniquely theirs.

  37. Kate Gribble
    Twitter: @KAGribbs
    Blog: http://kategribble.blogspot.com/

    “Then comes my favorite part: the kids have no idea whether they should laugh or not and my face gives nothing away”

  38. I heard someone say “better late than never”, which I’ll wholeheartedly echo.

    Name: Nicholas Chan
    Twitter: @sergtpeppa
    Blog: http://sergtpeppa.wordpress.com / Big Honkin’ WordPress
    Post title: Mission #1: Try and Push
    URL : http://sergtpeppa.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/mission-1-try-and-push/

    The crux of the matter: “My gut reaction to this prompt is to do what my students do: worm my way around the question without actually answering it. So here’s what I’m most focused on for this year: creating a classroom that builds on my students and their personalities and quirks (and how that works with my personalities and quirks) (all while honoring and recognizing the successes they’ve had with math) (and shows that even mistakes are a step forward).”

  39. Hi, I’m Robin and I tweet @romathio. My blog is also titled romathio. My blog post is: MTBOS week 1 – my class is different due to no F’s! You can read it here: http://romathio.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/mtbos-week-1-my-class-is-different-due-to-no-fs/

    For the first time ever, all of my students are not only passing my classes, they have also passed their unit tests. I mean EVER. My blog shares why I think this is happening this year.

  40. My name is Barry Lewis (@2ndarymathedist), blogging at Gleaming Number Rockets. My post is entitled: MTBoS Mission 1: How Rich Is Rich? Here it is: http://gleamingnumberrockets.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/mtbos-mission-1-how-rich-is-rich/
    “An image comes to mind: once in a Dallas, TX neighborhood, I saw a young child riding her small bicycle. It had only one training wheel, the other presumably having been removed after some time spent riding with both. Brilliant, I thought; a brilliant mix of guided and self-controlled exploration.”

  41. My name is Lea Ann Smith (@SmithTeach) and my blog is called Algebra 1 for the 21st Century. I’ve been blogging for about a year, here’s my post for the first challenge: http://leaannsmith.blogspot.com/2013/10/mtbos-prompt-1.html

  42. Hey there! My name is Kyle Kline and my blog is at: http://mrklineskronicles.blogspot.com/ This blog post is titled, “Flipping/Singing/Acting for my High School Math Students”. It basically is my poor attempt at trying to make math interesting and entertaining for my PreCalculus students by adding some personality to my math videos. Please feel free to let me know how you make your “flipped classroom” work for you and your students.

  43. Hello MTBoS awesome people:
    I’m John Berray (@johnberray).
    I blog at http://johnberray.wordpress.com
    The members of the MTBoS are my tribe, even though we haven’t all met.
    I whipped up a post called “Mission #1: Exploring the MTBoS” at http://wp.me/p1xOOk-8q.
    Sneak peek: “I want them to grasp how slowly these graphs march off through the Cartesian plane in their deliberate quest to be part of the infinite. If a student cries out, “logarithms grow as slowly as their inverse exponential counterparts grow quickly” I’ve won. Okay, that never happens.”

  44. Judy Keeney
    @judithkeeney
    3yellowsandpails.com
    Exploring the MathTwitterBlogosphere
    http://3yellowsandpails.com

    Hi-I am Judy Keeney. My blog is 3yellowsandpails. The very unoriginal title of my post is MathTwitterBlogosphere and is found at http://3yellowsandpails.com

    I spent all week struggling with what to write about since I am a math coach and I don’t have my own classroom. But, I do have an amazing colleague who lets me hang out in her 2 math lab class and be part of the design team and help decide what happens in these great classes.

  45. Page Stites
    @pstites
    My blog’s title is “Tangents and Normals” and its URL is http://tangentsandnormals.wordpress.com/

    My first post is called “Survey Bias” and you can find it here: http://tangentsandnormals.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/exploring-the-mathtwitterblogosphere-challenge-1/

    My post is about an open-ended project I use in my Statistics class to get students thinking about (and creating!) various forms of survey bias.

  46. Hello, my name is Mary Williams (@merryfwilliams) and my blog is Dividing by Zero. For Mission #1 I wrote about how I use a foldable book in my Algebra I classes. You can read about it at http://wp.me/p2oOLZ-1I

    “I just love the way 8th graders are engaged when they are folding, cutting gluing and decorating foldables with information. And I LOVE the way I see them using the foldables as a resource to help them learn challenging content.”

  47. My name is Shawn Saylor. I am jumping into social media head first! I am new to Twitter, you can find me @SaylorShawn. My first blog post is unoriginally titled “Exploring the MathTwitterBlogshere”
    can be found at http://absolutepi.wordpress.com/ Is there an absolute value of pi? With everything on my plate, I feel like I am going in circles or falling down rabbit holes! I look forward to learning new technology, filing away new lesson ideas, and making new friends along the way!!

  48. Brie Pagano
    Pondering Pagano
    Open ended word problem
    http://ponderingpagano.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/open-ended-word-problem/

    I teach algebra in San Diego. Looking forward to learning 🙂

  49. better late than never!

    Name: kate
    Blog: in pursuit of nerdiness (http://inpursuitofnerdiness.wordpress.com)
    Blog Post: John is a Parallelogram
    Blog URL: http://inpursuitofnerdiness.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/mtbos-1-john-is-a-parallelogram/

    Summary: My “rich task” involves a rotating group project where students apply their knowledge of coordinate geometry to do things like this: J (6, 8) O (14, 6) H (-1, -3) N(-9, -1)
    What kind of quadrilateral is John? What kind of quadrilaterals isn’t he? PROVE IT!

    • Hey LeVgerelyiikins!!!Yuah, if I'd had any sense, I'd have done something like that. I should at least have applied somewhere else in attempt to see if I could open up some other possibilities.p.s. Can I add your blog to ?

  50. LeeAnn Allen (twitter to come)
    DIY Math: PD (http://diymathpd.wordpress.com)
    Transformations and Chalk [MTBoS Mission #1] (http://diymathpd.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/transformations-and-chalk-mtbos-mission-1/)

    The very first activity I did with my kids to start congruence was to go outside and get our hands dirty (literally).
    Our medium: sidewalk chalk

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