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Round #3 of the #MTBoSBlogsplosion

Welcome to the third week of the 2017 MTBoS blogging initiative!  Remember that you can ALWAYS jump in and blog for any week!  You can just start this week, or go back and complete the previous missions if you would like.  We would love to have you!

Many of you probably landed here because of blogposts written by other math teachers.  So, this week let’s all give back to the community by sharing our favorite blog post or posts!

 

This week, the prompt is Read and Share!  

We will read blog posts by other math educators and then chose one (or many) to write about on our blogs.

You can either:

  1. Write about a single blogpost.  Please leave a comment on their post!
  2. Compile a bunch of blogposts that you love.  Here are some ideas to get you started:
    1. You can pick a bunch of various posts.
    2. You can blog around a theme.  Examples:
      1. A unit you are getting ready to cover
      2. Helpful classroom tools or ideas
      3. People or posts that inspire you
      4. And more and more!!
    3. You can read blogs by people who are in your area and blog about them. Yes, the #MTBoS has a search engine that can show you that!

Helpful tips

Please include a link back to the post(s) your are referring to in your post.  To add a link to your post, highlight the text you want to link, and then click the paperclip looking icon.

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How to Add a Link

Where to find great posts!

RIGHT HERE is a great place to start, especially since many of our contributors are first time bloggers and would love to get feedback.  Please look through the posts from the first two weeks of this initiative (listed at the end of this post) and pick one that appeals to you, then blog about it!

#MTBoS Google Search Engine

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Yes!  That exists!  Google search is great, but has it’s limitation.  This is a Google Search that was designed by John Stevens,  and is the number one place to search for topics ONLY from blogs posts.  The example below shows the results on a search for quadratics.

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#MTBoS Directory

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The #MTBoS directory helps you find teachers in the #MTBoS using many different parameters, including geographical region, academic content/interest, special interests and more!  You can also add yourself to the directory!

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Deadline: Press submit by the end of the day Saturday, January 21, 2017.

Once you are finished with your blog post, fill out the form below and your blog post will be featured on this site next week!

Don’t forget to tweet your post out with the hashtags #MTBoS  #MtbosBlogsplosion

 

Week 1 Blog Post Roundup

Week 2 Blog Post Round Up

2017 Week Two Round Up of #MTBoS Blog Posts

Here are all of the posts about Soft Skills for week two of the 2017 Blogging Initiative! Below are the posts, sorted by grade level, with general posts at the bottom. Take time to read and comment if you would like! Be on the lookout later today for the prompt for week 3!

Grades 6 – 8

Jdaomath @jdaomath, has a blog named mathemusings..
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Soft Skills: Building Confidence” and the author sums it up as follows: Exploring different structures and strategies that build student confidence. Student jobs, Open Ended Warm-ups, Error Analysis/ My Favorite No.

David Walker , has a blog named Common Core Geometry.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled The MTBoS, Week 2: Two Important Soft Skills” and the author sums it up as follows: One important soft skill is how to ask the students questions. A second is how to listen to their answers.

Tom Hall @trigoTOMetry, has a blog named Trigotometry.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #MTBoSBlogsplosion: Positive Praise” and the author sums it up as follows: My growth in using positive praise this year and how I want to use it in the future.

AnnaMarie Pacura @ampacura, has a blog named I Am a Math Teacher.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled The Soft Skills of Teaching Middle School Mathematics” and the author sums it up as follows: My reflection on the unique set of soft skills that are needed to be a great middle school math teaching, including the passion of being a learner, and the delicate balance that is teaching middle schoolers.

Cathy Yenca @mathycathy, has a blog named MathyCathy’s Blog.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Teaching ^(Adolescent Humans) Mathematics #MTBoS #MtbosBlogsplosion” and the author sums it up as follows: Check out a few classroom-culture-building experiences that have evolved in my middle school mathematics classroom.

Algebra 1 or 2

Laura Jenkins @mrsjtweetsmath, has a blog named Mrs. J’s Classroom.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled These are a few of my favorite things…from the #MTBoS” and the author sums it up as follows: 3 things stolen from #MTBoS that you can use in your classroom today!

Pre-Calculus

Aimee Shackleton @aimeeshack, has a blog named Techsponential learning.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Favourite websites – Desmos classroom activities” and the author sums it up as follows: An introduction to using Desmos.com in the classroom, focusing on classroom activities.

Fracqua , has a blog named Matematici.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled How to test a lot without testing much” and the author sums it up as follows: Here I talk about my struggles in the search of a balance between testing students often and freeing students from tests.

General

Sam Shah @samjshah, has a blog named Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Girls and Math” and the author sums it up as follows: This post takes snippets of my year that revolve around encouraging girls in mathematics. It is not a success story, nor is it a failure. It has just given me some food for thought.

Micaela Newman @altmath, has a blog named Alternative Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Soft Skills: MTBoS Blogging Initiative ” and the author sums it up as follows: Reflection on what we mean by soft skills and how they sow up in my teaching. Also..be kind to yourself. If you are thinking about this, you probably have some skills 🙂

Liz Mastalio @MissMastalio, has a blog named Mastalio. Math. Mavericks..
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Honestly, the Math is Secondary” and the author sums it up as follows: The most important thing you can do is get to know your students as people. Even when they don’t want you to. You just have to be sneaky about it.

Pat Ciula , has a blog named Just MSU.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Week 2, With Time to Spare!” and the author sums it up as follows: Not feeling like I could add anything significant about Soft Skills, I shared two remarkable and insightful contributions made by others, and included some Talking Points.

Nolan Doyle @ndoyle1015, has a blog named Math Mulligans.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Soft Skills” and the author sums it up as follows: I believe every interaction you have with your students involves soft skills. There are some soft skills I feel come naturally to me yet others that are much more challenging. For those more challenging soft skills, I have to set goals and create structures in my classroom and instruction to help me improve.

Anna Blinstein @borschtwithanna, has a blog named Borscht With Anna.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Why Might Students Be Motivated in Math Class” and the author sums it up as follows: One aspect of “soft skills” is motivating students to care about your class and put work into learning mathematics. I have recently been thinking about the ways that different groups of students might be motivated or connect to the class in different ways and how we might need to structure the class and our interactions with them differently.

Jamie Garner @mavenofmath, has a blog named mavenofmath.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Math Story” and the author sums it up as follows: Every teacher has a story. Here is mine.

Jennifer Abel @abel_jennifer, has a blog named Mathsational.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #MTBoSBlogsplosion Week 2: Soft Skills – Collaboration” and the author sums it up as follows: Using Kagan Strategies to to structure collaborative assignments.

Karen D. Campe @KarenCampe, has a blog named Reflections and Tangents.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Exams Ahead!” and the author sums it up as follows: Preparing for semester exams: how to be successful and not overwhelmed.

Gregory Taylor @mathtans, has a blog named Mathie x Pensive.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Soft Skills: The Middle Ground” and the author sums it up as follows: I claim I have soft skills, but only use them by request, in part because dealing with people is exhausting. Is that just me? Also, a tip about finding “the middle ground” between love and hate, and how familiarity can be a factor.

Denise Gaskins @letsplaymath, has a blog named Let’s Play Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Math Inspirations: Why Study Mathematics?” and the author sums it up as follows: If you or your students are singing the “Higher Math Blues,” here are some quotations that may cheer you up — or at least give you the strength of vision to keep on slogging.

Jenn Vadnais @RilesBlue, has a blog named Communicating Mathematically.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Teacher Moves – Soft Skills” and the author sums it up as follows: The post provides concrete examples of how teachers can use soft skills in their daily interactions with students.

Nathaniel Highstein @nhighstein, has a blog named 17Goldenfish.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled MTBoS 2017 Soft Skills: My Grade 8 Exit Trip” and the author sums it up as follows: This post includes some details of a trip I organize each year at the end of 8th grade. Students have a chance to showcase some academic skills, but the important message is that we love them and that they are strongest when they demonstrate that they love each other.

Cheryl Leung @MathEasyAsPi, has a blog named Math Easy As Pi.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled A Matter Of Belief” and the author sums it up as follows: My post is a sideways examination of soft skills. I wrote about a young woman gaining confidence in her abilities in math and the things that I think might have helped her discover her very real strength.

Marissa W @viemath, has a blog named La Vie Mathématique.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Soft Skills: Encouraging Perseverance #MTBoSBlogsplosion” and the author sums it up as follows: This post is about how I encourage perseverance by using vertical and horizontal non-permanent surfaces, and Sara VanDerWerf’s Scale of Persistence videos about people stuck on an escalator and a beagle going after a chicken nugget.

Pamela Rawson @rawsonmath, has a blog named rawsonmath.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled “I’m not good at math.”” and the author sums it up as follows: A brief glimpse into how I work with my students to get them to move from “I can’t” to “I can.” Teaching skills through problem solving teaches my students that they are capable of doing more than just arithmetic or following algorithmic solutions.

Janet Hollister @JanetHollister, has a blog named Pi R Sqaure.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Soft Skills – Building From Strength” and the author sums it up as follows: In this blog post I remember a student that was an amazing problem solver when it comes to 3-D puzzles and struggled with procedural math. We used his visualization skill to help him find success in mathematics.

Wwndtd @wwndtd, has a blog named What Would Neil deGrasse Tyson Do?.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #MTBoSBlogsplosion: Soft Skills” and the author sums it up as follows: Distancing their verbal responses from the specter of “correct” has been really useful in getting more kids to talk more often.

Mark Chubb @markchubb3, has a blog named Thinking Mathematically.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled The smallest decisions have the biggest impact!” and the author sums it up as follows: How do we know how much scaffolding to provide? When do we give it? What does it look like? This post offers thinking behind our little decisions we make, and what those decisions mean for our students.

Julie Reulbach @jreulbach, has a blog named I Speak Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Student Blogging Class, 2017” and the author sums it up as follows: This post is about a blogging class that I teach during the Winterm week at my school. I love that I get to share blogging with students, and that I get to teach something other than math for one week of the year.

 

2017 Week One Round Up of #MTBoS Blog Posts

Thanks to all who posted during week one of the 2017 Blogging Initiative!  Below are the posts, sorted by grade level, with general posts at the bottom.  Take time to read and comment if you would like!  Be on the lookout later today for the prompt for week 2!

Grades 6 – 8

Cheryl Leung@ @MathEasyAsPi, has a blog named Math Easy As Pi.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Minions In Math – My Favorite Thing” and the author sums it up as follows: Miniature robots zoomed across coordinate planes, putting on light displays at ordered pairs. This was the perfect way to review linear relationships and introduce systems of equations while simultaneously developing some coding experience.

Melynee Naegele @MNmMath, has a blog named mNm Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled One of My Favorites” and the author sums it up as follows: Tools I use to streamline instructional routines.

AnnaMarie Pacura @ampacura, has a blog named I Am A Math Teacher.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled MTBoS 2017 Blogging Initiative: My Favorites” and the author sums it up as follows: I shared my favorite middle school math resources that have used so far this year in my 6th, 7th, and 8th grade Algebra 1 classes, and one that I hope to use soon.

David Walker , has a blog named Common Core Geometry.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled The MTBoS Week 1: My Favorite Game” and the author sums it up as follows: Last year I was a sub, and I played this game to engage the students. Now I’m a full-time teacher, and this game works great when introducing new material.

Algebra 1 and 2

Julie Morgan @fractionfanatic, has a blog named fractionfanatic.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favourites” and the author sums it up as follows: A new favourite foldable made this year. It’s purpose is to help my pupils understand how to sketch quadratics.

Nathaniel Highstein @nhighstein, has a blog named 17Goldenfish.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled MTBoS 2017: My favorite… tool for teaching transformations” and the author sums it up as follows: Using Desmos Marbleslides consistently across function families has made a huge difference in my students’ comfort and facility in transforming graphs from a parent function. Fun, depth of understanding, and perseverance!

SB Vaughn @vaughn_trapped, has a blog named vlogakavaughnlog.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Completing The Square Completes Me” and the author sums it up as follows: I just love completing the square. It can make heroes!

Taylor Cesarski @tcesarski, has a blog named Exponential Growth.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled MTBoS My Favorite Thing” and the author sums it up as follows: As a student teacher, I’m excited to implement two-column practice this semester as a way for students to practice working with equations while also talking about mathematics! Collaboration on this activity allows students to be accountable for their mistakes and work together towards mastery.

Trever Reeh @treverreeh, has a blog named Math Techniques and Strategies.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite Marshmallow Catapult” and the author sums it up as follows: Students always ask me what parabolas are good for and why you need to know the equation of one? This activity is hands-on and gives students insight on how mathematical modeling will help them in their future.

Jennifer Abel @abel_jennifer, has a blog named Mathsational.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #MTBoSBlogsplosion Week 1: My Favorite Lesson So Far This Year – Candy Catapult Quadratics” and the author sums it up as follows: Algebra 2 students use a catapult to shoot candy, collect data, and write equations of parabolas. They even use parametric equations to make predictions (but don’t tell them that).

Geometry

Elena Histand Stuckey @elhistuck, has a blog named Finding the Good.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorites” and the author sums it up as follows: My post outlines why I finally started a blog and my new favorite idea for using plastic overhead transparencies without the overhead projector.

Pre-Calculus

Sam Shah @samjshah, has a blog named Continuous Everywhere but Differentiable Nowhere.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled 2, 4, 6, 8, What Do We Appreciate? A Card Sort!” and the author sums it up as follows: I don’t really think of doing card sorts in my class. They take time to create, and I always second guess their value. But I did what I thought was a really basic card sort in my standard precalculus class before we embarked on a unit on sequences, and it turned out to be just challenging enough to generate great conversations.

Fracqua has a blog named Matematiche.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Blogging initiative” and the author sums it up as follows: Tricks to get students work in groups quickly, happily and effectively

Statistics

Gregory Taylor @mathtans, has a blog named Mathie x Pensive.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Fave: Media Math” and the author sums it up as follows: It’s about a media assignment that involves looking at bias within a student-chosen article about statistics. Includes reference to a webpage that allows analysis of sample sizes, by raosoft.

Jenni Clarkin @mrsclarkin, has a blog named Something to Smile About.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite Class to Teach” and the author sums it up as follows: A little about me and why AP Stats is my favorite class to teach. Find out what makes it great and the awesome community of people who are part of it and want you to be too!

General

Suzanne Milkowich @smilkowich, has a blog named I Teach Math….
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My favorite thing is….whiteboards!” and the author sums it up as follows: I reference my three favorite things. Kahoot, the Grudge Game, and whiteboards.

Julie Reulbach @jreulbach, has a blog named I Speak Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled You MUST Try Desmos Activity Builder” and the author sums it up as follows: Desmos Activity Builder is the favorite thing that I use in my classroom. I created a Desmos Activity Builder that will expose teachers to many of the features Activity Builder has to offer. Go to my post to experience Activity Builder for yourself!

TAnnalet @TAnnalet, has a blog named Chasing Number Sense.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite: From Sharing to Discussion” and the author sums it up as follows: I often notice that students are eager to share their ideas but are not paying attention to the ideas of others. I shared an example of a lesson where I noticed authentic mathematical discussion and noted how it was supporting my less confident students. I also have a few questions that I hope the MTBOS community can wonder about with me.

Jennifer Potier @jjfreo, has a blog named Mathematics Dreaming – From Rational to Real.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Two of My Favourites – 2016 in Review” and the author sums it up as follows: The Mathematics classroom should be a safe, engaging and inspirational place to learn and love Mathematics. This post shares two of my most successful resources in 2016 – one very specific, and one very general. My belief is about learning to let go of a teacher centred learning environment and moving towards a challenging, motivating student-centred atmosphere that encourages exploration, questioning, challenge and collaboration. If your students aren’t challenged, OR if they do not learn to question, then they are NOT learning.

Geonz @geonz, has a blog named Resource ROom Blog.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #MTBOS I think I’m here…” and the author sums it up as follows: It’s about my goal(s) for the year and trying to figure out how to move the blog to my website and have a blog launch page.

Micaela Newman @altmath, has a blog named Alternative Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Student Grouping: My Favorite” and the author sums it up as follows: A simple way to adjust card sorts by using student groups to enhance discourse. Keeps the students engaged and working with many different voices.

Julia Finneyfrock @jfinneyfrock, has a blog named Designated Deriver .
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite: Seesaw!” and the author sums it up as follows: My favorite is about the app Seesaw! Seesaw is an interactive app for students and teachers to share videos, pictures and more!

Brianne Beebe @BusyMissBeebe, has a blog named Busy Miss Beebe.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My New Favorite Routine” and the author sums it up as follows: I’m loving my new routine. It’s become my favorite thing.

Anna Blinstein @borschtwithanna, has a blog named Borscht With Anna.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #MtbosBlogsplosion – My Favorites” and the author sums it up as follows: Using structured forms for peer feedback has been very helpful for my students this year. I’m sharing a form we have used for write-ups (developed by my awesome colleague Mandy) and one I just made for homework.

Greta @g_brgmn, has a blog named Count it All Joy.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorites: 2 Equation Activities” and the author sums it up as follows: SolveMe Mobiles is an app that is easy to use and great for getting students thinking algebraically. Balance Points is a movement activity/brain break that has student physically show the answer to an equation.

Algebra’s Friend @algebrasfriend, has a blog named Algebra’s Friend.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Don’t judge a book by its cover – preview it!” and the author sums it up as follows: I recommend Stenhouse Publishers as a site for previewing professional reading.

Wwndtd @wwndtd, has a blog named What Would Neil deGrasse Tyson Do?.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #MTBoSBlogspolsion: My Favorite” and the author sums it up as follows: So many dry erase fumes, so little time! (Maybe that’s why everyone loves whiteboards!)

Jamie Garner @mavenofmath, has a blog named Maven of Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled #mathconfession” and the author sums it up as follows: Mathematicians and teachers of mathematics are not perfect. Here is my #mathconfession. What’s yours?

Denise Gaskins @letsplaymath, has a blog named Let’s Play Math.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite Math Games” and the author sums it up as follows: I’ve posted a lot of math games in 10+ years of blogging. Here, I’ve collected links to 26 games for preschool through adult players.

SergtPeppa @sergtpeppa, has a blog named Big Honkin’ WordPress.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite: Group Roles” and the author sums it up as follows: Some thinking on groupwork roles and how we’ve thought through them and implemented them for emerging multilinguals.

Liz Mastalio @MissMastalio, has a blog named Mastalio. Math. Mavericks..
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite: Classroom Tool” and the author sums it up as follows: My favorite (and my student’s favorite) thing about my classroom is when we write on the tables with dry erase markers. It’s a motivational tool that makes my students more comfortable making mistakes!

Pamela Rawson @rawsonmath, has a blog named rawsonmath.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite Games” and the author sums it up as follows: Advisory is about building relationships. Sometimes you have to put aside the work and just play a game together.

Janet Hollister @JanetHollister, has a blog named Pi R Square.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorite Math Practice” and the author sums it up as follows: This post is about how my understanding of the math practices has developed over time and how I have come to appreciate MP 7.

Anne Nedved @anedved, has a blog named Growing the Math Mind.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled New learning for the new year.. My favorite strategy” and the author sums it up as follows: Three strategies that have transformed my teaching

Adrienne Jones @aidigator, has a blog named Like a Good Teacher I Try New Things.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My Favorites” and the author sums it up as follows: Making connections to my students and how that is as important as the math that happens. I let them know a bit about me which builds trust.

John O’Malley IV @jomalleyiv, has a blog named Functions Are Fun.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Marker Magic – Practice @ The Board” and the author sums it up as follows: This post is about one of my favorite ways for students to practice skills.

Keegan Phillips @missmathematic, has a blog named inspiredmath.
The post for the Blogging Initiation is titled My favorite…” and the author sums it up as follows: When you’re passionate about 5 million different pursuits and things, how can you choose just one? This is exactly why I want to teach!

New Year, New Blog!

Welcome to the Explore the MTBoS 2017 Blogging Initiative!

With the start of a new year, there is no better time to start a new blog!  For those of you who have blogs, it is also the perfect time to get inspired to write again!

Please join us to participate in this years blogging initiative!  To join, all you need to do is write just one post a week for the next four weeks.  To make it easier for you, we will post a new prompt every Sunday!  Once you have blogged, please fill out the form below.  Each week, your blogs will be posted on this site for all to enjoy!

This Week’s Theme:  My Favorites

This week, the blogging theme will be “My Favorites”, where you can post about one (or many) of your favorite things!  Called a “My Favorite,” it can be something that makes teaching a specific math topic work really well.  It does not have to be a lesson, but can be anything in teaching that you love!  It can also be something that you have blogged or tweeted about before.  Some ideas of favorites that have been shared are:

  • A lesson (or part of one) that went great
  • A game your students love to play
  • A fun and/or effective way to practice facts
  • A website or app you love to use in class
  • An organizational trick or tip that has been life changing
  • A product that you use in your classroom that you can’t live without!

Blog Newbies!

If you are brand new to blogging, you can read Starting A Blog from the 2015 initiative.  This post will give you specific instructions on how to start a blog.

Hot Tip!  Don’t stress about your blog name!

The hardest part about blogging is often coming up with a title.  Do not let this detail derail you!  A great suggestion is to make your blog address your name.  Then, you can title your blog later – or change the title anytime you want!  To see what this looks like, check out Sam Shah’s blog.  His web address is samjshah.com, but the site name is “Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere“.  No one cares about your blog name, they just want to read interesting, inspiring, and helpful posts!

Hashtag it!  #MTBoS #MtbosBlogsplosion 

Don’t forget to tweet out your blog link and add hashtags so other teachers in the MTBoS community can easily find your post!  If you are not tweeting yet, you should be!  There is an amazing community of math educators there just waiting to inspire and support you!  Check out How To Start a Twitter Account to get started!  Also, if you are brand new to Twitter or just want to get more out of it, there are more Twitter tips on Julie Reulbach’s blogpost, Tweet, Connect, Repeat.

This year, we are joining up with the #mtbosblogsplosion.  Special thanks to  Carl Oliver@carloliwitter, for jump starting blogging for many people in our community!

Hashtags to add to your tweets:  #MTBoS #MtbosBlogsplosion

Also, if you have a wordpress blog, please re-blog this post to get the word out!

 

Deadline: Press submit by the end of the day Saturday, January 7, 2017.

Yes, this is a quick turn around this week – but we don’t want you to put it off or delay!  Once you are finished with your blog post, fill out the form below and your blog post will be featured on this site next week!   

Week 2 of the 2016 Blogging Initative!

“My Favorite”

Welcome to week 2 of the blogging initiative!  Hopefully you were able to post last week and enjoyed the challenge!  But even if life caught up with you last week and you did not have the opportunity to blog, you can still blog this week!  Every week is a new opportunity.

Be sure to read the comments on each of the previous challenges so you can discover other new bloggers.  Also, visit the One Good Thing blog and the DITL (Day In The Life) Tumblr site when you get a chance as new contributors are always welcome.

Our week two blogging challenge is to simply blog about one of your favorite things.  Called a “My Favorite,” it can be something that makes teaching a specific math topic work really well.  It does not have to be a lesson, but can be anything in teaching that you love!  It can also be something that you have blogged or tweeted about before.  Some ideas of favorites that have been shared are:

  • A lesson (or part of one) that went great
  • A game your students love to play
  • A fun and/or effective way to practice facts
  • A website or app you love to use in class
  • An organizational trick or tip that has been life changing
  • A product that you use in your classroom that you can’t live without!

Also, in two weeks, you will blog about a lesson that you have taught so it would be great to start thinking about a lesson you would like to share.  It does not have to be an original lesson (as we do so much sharing here in the #MTBoS).  It can even be a lesson that you found on a blog and decided to try out for yourself!

Deadline: Press submit by the end of the day Saturday, January 23, 2016.

If you’d like a little graphic to include in your post, here is a little whatchamacallit we made:

MyFav

When you’ve written and published your blogpost:

  1. Tweet out the link to your blogpost with a short description, and include the #MTBoS hashtag.
  2. If you’re a mentee, email your mentor the link! And if you’re a mentor, read and comment on your mentee’s post!
  3. In the comments to this blogpost here, throw down the link to your blogpost and a short teaser.
  4. Look at the three comments that are listed above your comment. Click on those three links, read the three blogposts, and talk to the authors by leaving a comment on their blogposts (not here).

Lastly, the #MTBoS can be a lot of information. So many blogs to read, not enough time! So we highly recommend signing up for the Global Math Department newsletter (click here to do so! see a sample herehere’s the GMD webpage!). Once a week, someone in the #MTBoS looks through what the community has produced, and shares some of their favorite things.

 

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Mission #5: Twitter Chatter, Subject Matter

Hey all!  It’s Julie again!

I hope that you all are enjoying the challenges!  Remember, you can jump in anytime! This weeks mission involves Twitter so if you skipped “Mission #2, Twitter Me This“, you may want to revisit it for terrific tips on creating a Twitter account.

This week your mission is to attend a Twitter Chat!  Twitter Chats are one hour weekly chats held on Twitter. There are many different types of Twitter Chats, from general education chats to book chats. The twitter chats I love the most are the subject specific math chats just for math teachers! This week you are going to have the chance to specifically interact with teachers across the world that teach exactly the same subjects you teach! And there are math subject chats for everything from Middle School Math to Calculus and Statistics!

Browse the list below to see what day and time your chat is happening! Don’t be intimidated if you are a newcomer, you don’t even have to type anything to participate – you can just listen! But I promise that you will be compelled to jump in!  Read below for more helpful hints!

Twitter Math Subject Chat List

Click on the subject links for chat archives.

Subject Twitter # Day / Time Subject this week Facilitator
Middle School Math  #msmathchat Monday 9PM EDT Baiting the hook with chicken wings.* @justinaion @shlagteach
Algebra 1  #alg1chat Sunday 9 PM EDT Group Work @lmhenry9  @_MattOwen_  @aanthonya @kathrynfreed
Algebra 2  #alg2chat Monday 9PM EDT Functions @druinok  @wmukluk  @lbburke
Geometry #geomchat Wednesday 9 PM EDT Meaningful Math Tasks Across All Topics @algebrainiac1  @barbarawmadden
PreCalculus #Precalcchat Thursday 8:30 PM EST Unit Planning & Assessment* @mrlenadj  @untilnextstop
Calculus #calcchat Friday 11AM as per IST – that is 12:30am EST and 1:30am EDT TBD @ajitmishra71
Statistics #statschat Thursday 9pm EDT TBD @jkindred13

** If none of the subject chats appeal to you, there are 200+ different education chats listed here!!  Thanks to @thomascmurray, @cevans5095  and @cybraryman1 for compiling this great list!

* Additional Information:  

  • Middle School Math Chat
    • “Baiting the hook with chicken wings”  Dealing with the frustration of when an amazing lesson is met with blank stares.
  • PreCalc Chat
    • How (and how often) do you plan for content vs. planning for process/Math practices?
    • Do you generally emphasize manual analysis or calculator analysis? Has this changed over time for you?
    • What does the flow of a unit typically look like for you?
    • What elements of assessments (participation, quizzes, projects, reading, writing, reflection, etc) factor into your actual grading?

United Kingdom Chats:

As the US Twitter Chat times can be tough for people around the world, there are two UK chats that may interest you!  Thanks so much to Jan Pringle and Nik Doran for reminding me about these chats!

  • #UKEdChat – MATHS Subject Special on Thursday at 9PM, GMT
  • #mathscpdchat – on Tuesday evenings at 7PM, GMT

How to Follow a Twitter Chat

To easily follow a Twitter Chat, type the hashtag and chat name into the search box. For instance, #msMathChat. Then, Twitter.com will bring up all of the tweets that include that hashtag!  It will look like this:

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Twitter.com Hashtag Search

Helpful Hints:

  • It’s a good idea to follow the facilitators (listed above in the chart) so you don’t miss important tweets and reminders when the chat begins.
  • If you have never participated in a Twitter chat before you are in for a treat! To participate, you just need to include the hashtag (example: #msMathChat) in your 140 characters.
  • The moderator will ask a question and then everyone can answer it and discuss. (The format for chats is usually a question, Q1 from moderator, then you will answer with an A1 at the start of your answer.)
  • Don’t feel intimidated, because you don’t actually have to “chat” if you do not want to. You can simply log into twitter and watch the conversations. To do this, follow the hashtag. To follow a hashtag, simply perform a search on Twitter.
  • If your Twitter account is private, you may want to unlock your tweets during the math chat. This will allow people who do not follow you to read your chats for the hour.

If you can’t come to a chat, but want to catch up on the conversation, many of the math chats are archived with Storify on the Math Chat Wiki.

More Helpful Twitter Hints:  TweetDeck!

Several of you have commented that Twitter can confusing and even overwhelming at first. Some of you said you aren’t really following the feed, you are just checking in on #MTBoS. But guess what? You can do it all at once! My all time BIG TIP for making Twitter truly awesome is TweetDeck by Twitter!

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Screen Shot 2013-11-01 at 10.11.22 PMI love, love, love TweetDeck because I can see my entire Timeline (all of the tweets from all of people I follow – this is what you see on the Twitter.com page online), Interactions (people who are talking to me or including me in a conversation publicly), Messages (people who are talking privately just to me), and then any cool things I want to keep up with (like #msMathChat or #MTBoS). TweetDeck puts all of the most important stuff I want to read in COLUMNS (can you say Math Love)? It is ALL viewable in one place at the same time and looks like this…  If you perform a search, you can then create a whole new column from your hashtag search.  Notice the nifty little blue Add Column button at the bottom?  Yep, it’s true love.

Your mission for this week:

  1. Attend any twitter chat that you would like! The easiest way to “attend” a chat is to search for and then follow the hashtag. (Example:  #msMathChat).
  2. Write a blog post reflecting on your Twitter Chat experience.
  3. Tweet out your blog post. Include the hashtag for the chat you attended (#alg1chat) as well as the #MTBoS hashtag.
  4. Include your blogpost in the comments here and then read and comment on the blog posts of the three commenters directly above you. Be sure that you are commenting on their blog and not here. 🙂
GMD Autumn Special Poster

Mission #4: Listen and Learn

Don’t worry if time has been your enemy and you have not been able to complete (or even participate in) the first three missions. Please jump in anytime!  The goal of the Explore the MathTwitterBlogosphere is to introduce teachers to everything this vast community has to offer. 

Hello all!  It’s Julie Reulbach, and I’m so excited to share Mission #4 with you – Listen and Learn!

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Apparently, this is what I look like when I’m excited!

In the first few missions we connected through the written word via blogs and twitter. But for this mission, we are going to listen and learn, with a Global Math Department Webinar and an Infinite Tangents Podcast!

Below I’m going to explain what the Global Math Department and Infinite Tangents Podcast are all about. Then when you’re interested is piqued, I’ll introduce the actual mission at the bottom. And for a cherry on top, we have a bonus mission for you…if you choose to accept it.

The Global Math Department:

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One of the most amazing things about this community is what we produce together.  And, like Twitter Math Camp, Global Math is produced by teachers, for teachers.  Global Math was started by Megan Hayes-Golding, @mgolding, and is now hosted by Chris Robinson, @absvalteaching.  Megan, who is also a science teacher, had attended Global Physics Department webinars.  After attending Twitter Math Camp 2012 (#TMC12) in Saint Louis, she was inspired to develop a similar venue for math teachers.

The majority of the #TMC12 participants had read each others blogs and interacted on twitter. We felt we “knew” each other before we even arrived. However, hearing these dynamic teachers present brought the lessons they had blogged about to life!  It made us all want to hear more.  Thus, in August 2012, the Global Math Department was born.

“We are math teachers who share what we’ve learned, cause we don’t want our classes to suck the energy from students. Professional development among friends, not just colleagues. Fun! Immediately useful! Interesting!”  
– Global Math Department

Global Math is held every Tuesday evening at 9:00PM ET. Educators (mostly classroom teachers) present on different subjects each week ranging from interactive notebooks to rich tasks.   What’s awesome is that it’s for us, by us. Professional development based around what we care about!  Just LOOK at some of the most recent presentations!

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Global Math:  Autumn Special, An International Event

On November 2nd,  the Global Math Department is having an “Autumn Special”.  In order to better reach and serve our international members, Nik Doran, from the UK, is hosting an international Global Math Department event this Saturday, November 2nd at 9pm GMT (5pm EDT, 2pm PDT). It’s called the Global Math Autumn Special.  Please visit his blog to read about all of the details of the event.

GMD Autumn Special Poster

Don’t worry if you are not able to attend Global Math Department gathering live, as you can still view the event after the fact! One of the best things about Global Math is that every webinar is recorded!  Currently, there are over 60 webinars recorded that you can watch!

Overwhelmed by choice (or, no time to peruse and chose)? Here are some Global Math Presentations that you may enjoy watching.

Infinite Tangents Podcast:  A Mathematics Education Podcast for Teachers

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Ashli Black, @mythagon,  is the creator of Infinite Tangents, #8Tangents.

“Tangents started due to one simple reason: I love listening to people talk math education. Sharing favorite practices and discussing teaching philosophies with others makes me a better teacher. As 2013 started shaping up to be a year of travel, I decided it was the perfect opportunity to capture these conversations and put them out there for others to listen to.

Infinite Tangents is about the voices in education that can too often be drowned out by politics and policy-chat. This podcast is about the work teachers do daily to make their classrooms places where children can thrive. Episodes focus on happenings in the classroom, teachers reflecting on their practice, and other stories from the front lines. Here are the top three downloaded interviews:

The episode that started it all: @mathymcmatherso

Our Lady of Zen Teaching: @cheesemonkeysf

Math Forum superhero, author, and all-around cool guy: @maxmathforum

Tangents is currently publishing twice a month as I found producing weekly episodes is way more work then I can handle on top of my actual job. Interview episodes are around the 45 minute mark and I’ve broken many into two parts so as not to lose anything I found to be awesome. If there is anyone you would like to hear interviewed or you have questions for the interviewees from specific episodes, head over to tangentspodcast.com and leave a comment! Thanks for listening, and I hope you make a great week for yourself listening and learning about the MTBoS.”  – Ashli

**  Bonus Assignment:  Participate in Twittereen!

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I know you all are all overachievers, and love a good bonus assignment!

Twittereen is an epic costume party, where you can “dress up” your avatar as someone else on Twitter!   Please visit Megan’s blog to learn all about it!  The results are always hilarious!  Twittereen is so epic that we even had a special Global Math Twittereen Webinar devoted to it last year!  Even if you can’t participate this year, please join in the fun and follow the #twittereen hashtag!

@jreulbach dressed as @mgolding

@j_lanier dressed as @natbanting

@mrpicc112 dressed as @approx_normal

Your mission for this week:

You should pick one event to watch/listen, either Global Math or Infinite Tangents. Or you can do both! We won’t stop you!

  1. Attend the Global Math Autumn Special Event this Saturday, November 2nd at 9pm GMT (5pm EDT, 2pm PDT).  Global Math Autumn Special.  I recommend RSVPing to this event because when you register, Big Marker will send you an email reminder.  If you can’t make it to the live event, watch a previous webinar.
  2. Listen to any Infinite Tangents Podcast and then leave a comment on the Infinite Tangents website.
  3. Write a blog post reflecting on your “Listen and Learn” experience.  Please include if you were able to attend the event live, or watched a recording (or podcast) instead.
    • Tweet out your blog post. You might use @GlobalMath or @mythagon depending on which you wrote about. Include the #MTBoS and/or #GlobalMathDept or #8tangents hashtag.
    • Include your blogpost in the comments here and then read and comment on the blog posts of the three commenters directly above you.  Be sure that you are commenting on their blog and not here. 🙂