Mission #1: The Power of The Blog

Wow, wow, wow, wow, wow. Sam Shah here, and I’m beyond floored by how many people are interested in participating in Exploring the MTBoS. Floored, and overjoyed.

wowie

[this was a picture from my birthday, but I pretty much look like this all the time]

I honestly thought we’d find a few people out there who were interested in this beautiful, amazing group of math teachers — and BAM! There are a zillion of you, from all over, teaching all sorts of different things, all with differing experiences with blogs and twitter. I can’t tell you how much my heart swelled when I was reading through all the comments of people who signed up. I’m in heaven.

Now let’s see if we can’t make this worthwhile for you.

Almost all of you have read a few math teacher blogs — and that’s what brought you here. So we thought we’d center the first week around blogging… Each week a different one of us (Sam Shah, Tina Cardone, Justin Lanier, and Julie Reulbach) are going to be leading up a mission. This week (obviously) is my week.

So let’s go! Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start.

Mission #1: The Power of The Blog

For this Explore the MathTwitterBlogosphere program, you’re going to be doing a bunch of different challenges. Each of them is going to end with you doing a little reflection related to what you did. Thus, it’s important (at least for these few weeks) to have a blog to write on. Although we are going to be asking you to keep a blog for these 8 weeks, we are not going to be making you continue it. If you know me, you know that my current mantra about this online community is “There’s no right way to participate in this weird disjointed passionate community. Do what moves you. Do what makes sense for you.”

Part of this experience going outside of your comfort zone and exploring various things to see if any of them will prove useful for you. So try out keeping and writing in this blog for the next few weeks and see how it goes. If it turns out you find it useful and want to continue posting regularly, great. If not, that’s just as great. You have to do what’s useful for you! That being said…

We have two different missions for you, depending on if you have a blog or if you don’t.

If you don’t have a blog, look for the section of this post titled “ACK! I need a blog! Stat!” and only read that. Just skip to that part. Like now! GO!

If you already have a blog, look immediately below to find the section titled “I have a blog… Now what, Mister?!” 

I have a blog… Now what, Mister?!

Your mission is threefold.

1. You are going to write a blogpost on one of the following two prompts.

  • What is one of your favorite open-ended/rich problems?  How do you use it in your classroom? (If you have a problem you have been wanting to try, but haven’t had the courage or opportunity to try it out yet, write about how you would or will use the problem in your classroom.)

  • What is one thing that happens in your classroom that makes it distinctly yours? It can be something you do that is unique in your school… It can be something more amorphous… However you want to interpret the question! Whatever!

Just pick one prompt and post about it!

<rant> Now some part of you might be thinking: my rich problem isn’t rich enough! I’m embarrassed by it! I am new to teaching — so my classroom isn’t really distinctly mine yet. So I don’t have a perfect answer to the prompts! If that happens to you, just write about something similar. But I said this last year when getting people to write their first post: If you feel like you aren’t awesome at teaching, welcome to the club. If you feel constantly like everything else you see out there is better, welcome to the club. So if you’re new to teaching and have material that you’re proud of it, post it! We’re all starting this at different points, but the one thing I’ve learned is that I can steal ideas or be inspired or commiserate with first year teachers as easily as a veteran teacher. So try not to be self-conscious and obsessive. We’re all here to reflect on what we do, and to learn from each other. We’re not trying to be the best and we’re not out to impress each other. We’re out to get better. No one in the mathtwitterblogosphere is judging you, but yourself. So if you’re a sucky writer, own it and don’t worry about not being Tolstoy. If you feel like what you want to write has already been said on a lot of other places, write it anyway. This is you, for you, by you. Phew. </rant> 

2. You are going to write a comment on this blogpost. Your comment will say:

Your name (or pseudonym, if you’re using one)
Your Twitter handle (if you have one)
Your blog name
The title of your post
The URL of your post
One (or two) sentences from your post to capture a reader’s interest

Example:
My name is Sam Shah (@samjshah) and I’m blogging at _Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere_. The title of my blogpost is “Senior Letters 2012” (http://samjshah.com/2012/05/31/senior-letter-2012/).

To whet your appetite: “Each year at the end of the school year, I say goodbye to my seniors. And each year, I’ve written a letter to the seniors with some imparting thoughts as they go off in the world.”

3. Once you’ve posted your comment advertising your blogpost, look at the three previous comments (the ones above yours). Read the posts of these three people and write a comment each of their blogs! If you are one of those eager beavers who are the first three to post, just find three comments as people begin to post!

Seriously, that’s it for this week for you! Trust us — we’re going to have more in the coming weeks. But we’re starting with the basics!

ACK! I need a blog! Stat!

You made it here! Phew! Now for your mission. Your mission has a few parts… but don’t be daunted…

1. Come up with a blog title. It can be funny, it can be serious, it can make no sense, whatever. However, my one admonition: don’t spend more than 10 minutes coming up with this blog title. The more you struggle to choose it, the more annoying it is going to be, and I’m afraid you’re going to use this hassle of coming up with a blog title to be enough to stop you from blogging. This cannot happen. Not on my watch! So 10 minutes is all you have.

2. Start a blog. If you have no idea how to do this, go to my favorite blogging site wordpress.com and get a blog! Here’s an awesome two minute video showing the process.


The link is here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N0zXEwtjCI

3. Write a short blogpost on one of the following prompts. Yup, you’re already ready to go. See how easy setting up a blog was? EASY!:

  • Who are you? Introduce yourself to the MathTwitterBlogosphere! How’d you get into teaching? What do you like most about your job?
  • What is one of your favorite open-ended/rich problems?  How do you use it in your classroom? (If you have a problem you have been wanting to try, but haven’t had the courage or opportunity to try it out yet, write about how you would or will use the problem in your classroom.)

  • What is one thing that happens in your classroom that makes it distinctly yours? It can be something you do that is unique in your school… It can be something more amorphous… However you want to interpret the question! Whatever!
  • What brought you to the MTBoS? What do you hope to get out of participating in the #MTBoS?

I suppose it can be a long blogpost too. Whatever floats your boat. If you’re adventurous, bonus points (okay, there aren’t really points) and twenty unicorn rainbows (there are real, however!) if you include an image or a video or a link.

<rant> Now some part of you might be thinking: my rich problem isn’t rich enough! I’m embarrassed by it! I am new to teaching — so my classroom isn’t really distinctly mine yet. So I don’t have a perfect answer to the prompts! If that happens to you, just write about something similar. But I said this last year when getting people to write their first post: If you feel like you aren’t awesome at teaching, welcome to the club. If you feel constantly like everything else you see out there is better, welcome to the club. So if you’re new to teaching and have material that you’re proud of it, post it! We’re all starting this at different points, but the one thing I’ve learned is that I can steal ideas or be inspired or commiserate with first year teachers as easily as a veteran teacher. So try not to be self-conscious and obsessive. We’re all here to reflect on what we do, and to learn from each other. We’re not trying to be the best and we’re not out to impress each other. We’re out to get better. No one in the mathtwitterblogosphere is judging you, but yourself. So if you’re a sucky writer, own it and don’t worry about not being Tolstoy. If you feel like what you want to write has already been said on a lot of other places, write it anyway. This is you, for you, by you. Phew. </rant>

4. You are going to write a comment on this blogpost. Your comment will say:

Your name (or pseudonym, if you’re using one)
Your Twitter handle (if you have one)
Your blog name
The title of your post
The URL of your post
One (or two) sentences from your post to capture a reader’s interest

Example:
My name is Sam Shah (@samjshah) and I’m blogging at _Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere_. The title of my blogpost is “Senior Letters 2012” (http://samjshah.com/2012/05/31/senior-letter-2012/).

To whet your appetite: “Each year at the end of the school year, I say goodbye to my seniors. And each year, I’ve written a letter to the seniors with some imparting thoughts as they go off in the world.”

5. Once you’ve posted your comment advertising your blogpost, look at the three previous comments (the ones above yours). Read the posts of these three people and write a comment each of their blogs! If you are one of those eager beavers who are the first three to post, just find three comments as people begin to post!

We know this is a lot, asking you: hey, start a blog. But you did it! And you’re going to try it out! And for that, we are proud mama and papa bears! You are awesomesauce!

** Also, please be sure to comment on other bloggers posts on THEIR blogs instead of here.  Everyone loves getting comments on their blogs! 

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289 thoughts on “Mission #1: The Power of The Blog

  1. Shelby Aaberg
    @ShelbyAaberg
    Mathleticism: Teaching and Learning Math, Making Mistakes in a Good Direction
    Mailbox Placement
    http://mathleticism.net/?p=242

    What the students really want to know is whether it is possible to optimize the mail route in a way that benefits the administrator. My students will work on this problem next week in the computer lab.

  2. I am Lisa Henry (@lmhenry9) and I blog at An “Old Math Dog” Learning New Tricks. My post is “Explore #MTBoS – What Makes My Classroom Mine” and it can be found at http://www.teachesmath.com/?p=499. I share with you one of my students’ favorite things from my classroom – Friday Funnies. Every Friday I share a comic strip related to math. Enjoy!

    • I am trying to incorporate funnies on Mondays, I teach 7th graders and a lot of math comics are above their math level. I do like the Calvin & Hobbs and the Pumpkin pi ones on your blog. Thanks for sharing!

    • Nice post, Lisa. I have a bunch of comics, particularly Foxtrot, on old overhead transparencies. This was a nice reminder I need to digitize the collection. Do you have problems for the students to do associated with the Funny Friday comics?

  3. I am Nathan Kraft (@nathankraft1) and the name of my blog is inconsequential. The title of my post is “Death of a Marker” and you can find it here: http://nathankraft.blogspot.com/2013/10/death-of-marker.html
    “I feared the worst, rushed over to Black Dry-Erase Low Odor Chiseled Tip Expo Marker, picked it up, and attempted to draw a squiggle on the board. Alas, nothing came out.”

  4. I’m Brianne (@busymissbeebe). My blog is Busy Miss Beebe’s Secondary Solutions. Today I wrote “Exploring MTBos Post #1” in response to the second prompt. Read it here: http://busybeebe.blogspot.com/2013/10/exploring-mtbos-post-1.html. I kept it short and simple.

  5. I’m Leslie Billings, on twitter @leslie_su76. I blog at Leslie Billings forever student on WordPress. For this mission I wrote, “Show me the math” which can be found at http://wp.me/p2FH0H-19 A sample: One day one kid said for the umpteenth time, “This is stupid; I’ll never use this.” And I blew up.

  6. Hi, My name is Liz Madisetti, known as Ms Mads, to my students. My brand new blog is called “Mad about Math” and my first post is about a problem that I gave my students on the first day of school.
    http://lizziemad.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/four-fours-problem/

    • I took “how to learn math” too and I loved doing the four fours in my classroom. I had students working in groups of 4 on a big whiteboard and diving right in. It was great to listen to their conversations.

  7. @unmuddlemath
    I blog at Unmuddlemath: Learning to Help Students Learn. For this mission, I wrote, “Explore #MTBoS, Mission #1: What Makes My Learning Environment Mine.” (http://unmuddlemath.blogspot.com/2013/10/explore-mtbos-mission-1-what-makes-my.html)
    When I arrive at school each morning, I never know what I will be doing that day. I have no lesson plans….I don’t really have what I would consider a classroom. You could say that what I do have is a “learning environment” because learning happens every day.

  8. Hi! I’m Lucy! I’m on twitter @lsquared76 and have a blog post: http://lsquared76.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/mtbos-mission-1/

    I love teaching trig, and I love championship tournaments in sports, so I combined these two loves in my Unit Circle March Madness Bracket Challenge. Enjoy!

  9. Hi my name is George Bigham (@gbigham). My blog is called Mathodical and is at http://www.mathodical.org. I haven’t even enter my class yet (will start teaching 7th grade math this week), so I picked the first prompt. It is a question about what the best price is to sell a product for (best being defined as what will make you the most money.) For better or worse money is an unifying interest and no kid is going to say they aren’t going to use money in the “real” world.

    • Congrats on getting a job! I like your idea. It combines collecting and compiling data with using this data to justify your price point. I think students will really love it.

  10. Hi- My name is Jennifer Fairbanks @hhsmath My blog is called http://www.8ismyluckynumber.blogspot.com I hope it is okay I didn’t type a new post, but a recent one about a Disney project. Our kids have laptops so they planned a trip to Disney: http://8ismyluckynumber.blogspot.com/2013/09/disney-project-one-of-my-favorites.html

    • I had already seen this post (I follow you) and I passed it along to a few of the teachers at my school with the hope that they will use it. Great idea to bring math to real life!

  11. Hi, my name is Carrie Annable, on twitter I am @CarrieAnnable. I just created a blog called “Growing Mathematical Minds”! I am very excited and very nervous all at once! I am worried that now I can be “found” on the internet, but I guess that’s the point, right? I made a few posts to try it out, but the one about my favourite task is called, “A few of my favourite things” (spelled correctly! I am Canadian!), You can find it at: http://growingmathematicalminds.blogspot.ca/2013/10/a-few-of-my-favourite-things.html It is very similar to the one above but an extension of the four fours problem that I do with my students.

  12. Hi I am Mary Olsen, on twitter @marymary415 My blog is Faith Hope and Math and today I blogged about Mrs. Olsen’s World (sorry I can be a little wordy) My teaser: My student’s abilities were not matching with the pacing guide???What do I do? So in my core meetings I would listen to what all the other teachers were doing and I would try to do things the same way. FAIL! How did this happen??
    find the rest here: http://faithhopeandmath.blogspot.com/

  13. Hi, my name is Pamela Rawson (@rawsonmath). My blog is also rawsonmath. My post for this mission is, “What Time Will the Sun Rise?” at https://rawsonmath.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/what-time-will-the-sun-rise/. For this particular favorite task, students apply what they’ve learned about modifying trig functions to a new situation involving sunrise times, sunset times, or hours of daylight. I love that students don’t need me to tell them if they have created a correct model.

  14. Hello – I am Sarah Scott (@coylee33), and I wrote my very first blog post at my new blog site, http://mathorsomethinglikethat.wordpress.com/. The post is called, “Here We Go,” because I am finally getting started on this whole blogging experience, and I am NERVOUS. I picked the first prompt, which is basically me introducing myself. You can read it here: http://mathorsomethinglikethat.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/here-we-go/
    There are 23,498 factors of our jobs that just stink. But take those factors out, and I actually love my job. Connecting with students, and teaching them something new are the sole reasons I chose this career, and they are the sole reasons (well, those and school breaks) I am sticking with it, despite the fact that I get the Sunday blues way more often than I should admit…

  15. Hi my name is Lisa Simonick and I teach Algebra 1 at the high school level. My blog is entitled> “Teaching Algebra Outside my Comfort Zone”. My response to the challenge is here
    (http://lsimonick.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/mission-possible/)

    I write about my baby steps into open-ended lessons with a lesson I “borrowed” from another blogger and how creating Taco Wendy’s helped teach the distributive property.

  16. Federico Chialvo
    @FedericoChialvo
    Art of math Studio
    Fun with Collatz Conjecture
    http://artofmathstudio.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/fun-with-collatz-conjecture/

    You may have heard of Collatz Conjecture, it’s simple enough to explain to a 2nd grader, yet has stumped mathematicians for the last 80 years. Paul Erdos famously referred to it when he said “Mathematics is not yet ready for such problems.”

  17. Hey Everyone! My name is Joshua Wright and I teach Algebra I!

    Feel free to follow me for my occasional tweets at @jlwright12

    My blog site I’ll be using for this is called: “The World, Day by Day”

    My Blog post is titled: “Math without numbers: what does it MEAN?”
    Find it here! http://joshualeewright.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/math-without-numbers-what-does-it-mean/

    The hardest part about Algebra for students is that they have to look for a meaning behind the numbers and variables. To push my students I found a problem that strictly asked for meaning: no numbers, no vocabulary, just strict meaning of the variables. Students succeeded without ANY prior multiple variable experience.

  18. I’m Mary Dooms (@mary_dooms) and I blog at Curiouser and Curiouser. This week’s post is What to do when you don’t know what to do. It’s about using a rich task as a formative assessment, providing feedback, then giving students the opportunity to work in groups to create an improved solution.

  19. My name is Kaci McCoy (@nmcaligrl). My blog name is Math Mama and the title of the post for Mission #1 is Exploring MTBoS http://mathmama95.com/2013/10/06/exploring-mtbos/. Since this is only my second blog post, I chose to write about why I decided to Explore MTBoS. It was really the final push for me in creating a blog, among other things.

  20. Beth
    Algebra’s Friend
    Upcoming Problem Solving
    http://algebrasfriend.blogspot.com/2013/10/upcoming-problem-solving.html

    This year we have had time for short explorations. We chased the Tortoise, Hare, and Rat in a race. We munched on Oreos while we found the calories in the wafer and the stuffing. In the coming two weeks I am planning two problem solving days … How do you ensure that all students are working, thinking, communicating math when doing group problem solving??

  21. Andrew Shauver
    @hs_math_phys
    thegeometryteacher.wordpress.com
    The Real Value of the #MTBoS
    http://thegeometryteacher.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/the-real-value-of-the-mtbos/
    What makes my classroom distinctly mine is also what makes me so glad the #MTBoS is what it is.

  22. Hi all! I’m Jennifer! I’m on twitter @mrscoxey and just started a blog: http://middlinthrumath.wordpress.com/ I’m blogging today about my “MATH TOMS” and how I much I love middle school math.

  23. Victoria Hadlow @sundayteatime Maths and books.
    http://mathsandbooks.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/24-but-jack-bauer-free/
    “Then I let students work on it till we hear the first “Yes I got it”. Often that is the first maths success that learner has had for years and can be the start of my year-long maths isn’t torture campaign.”

  24. Hi, I am Amy Zimmer and I blog at Ms. Z Teaches in Mathland: http://zicker63.blogspot.com
    This Blog post is called, ” What makes my classroom uniquely Amy-ish.” It has a nice Geometry lesson that I CCSS’d. I write about everything, and think about how to make traditional lessons CCSS lessons.

  25. Hello awesome colleagues.
    Nat Highstein
    Twitter: @nhighstein
    My blog is called 17goldenfish: http://17goldenfish.com
    My post is titled, “One of my favorite number activities is the 4 4s.” http://17goldenfish.com/2013/10/06/one-of-my-favorite-number-activities-is-the-4-4s/

    It is about using a popular number sense game. “…one of my favorite number activities, the 4 4s is low entry, and high ceiling, and the mathematical context by itself gives us a place to explore the beauty of numbers and relationships.”

  26. Hi all, I’m Laura Hawkins (@LauraVHawkins) and I just started my blog, Math is Happening Now: http://mathishappeningnow.blogspot.com/

    I started with a post saying who I am and where I’ve been teaching, called Math is Happening When? A teaser: “It’s hard to learn when you’re wearing those same thin uniforms, but soaking wet and cold. Also you don’t have a pencil.”

    I’m looking forward to playing around the MTBoS with you all over the next 8 weeks!

  27. Hi, I’m David Knoppers, blogging from http://dxk941.wordpress.com/ and tweeting(infrequently) from @dxk941.

    My blog title is dxk941 until I think of something better, and my first post for the MTBoS, in another display of immense originality, is “MTBoS Mission # 1: What is one thing that happens in your classroom that makes it distinctly yours?” You can find it at http://dxk941.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/mtbos-mission-1-what-is-one-thing-that-happens-in-your-classroom-that-makes-it-distinctly-yours/

    In this post, I talk about how my high school upbringing makes me believe strongly in the capability of students to teach other students, and reflect a bit on how my efforts to cultivate peer-to-peer learning bump up against the typical trials of being a first-year teacher.

  28. Hello all,

    My name is Sebastian Speer (@Sebastian__S on Twitter). I just started my blog today and it is called Making Sense of Numbers. I blogged about an introduction of myself and an activity I call the amazing expanding expression. http://makingsenseofnumbers.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/introduction-and-the-amazing-expanding-expression/. It is an activity to help students understand the order of operations and see how changing expressions can alter the evaluation of that expression.

  29. My name is Francesca Bevilacqua (do you think you can pronounce it?) and I’m blogging at _Matematiche_.
    The link to my blogpost is: http://matematiche.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/what-makes-my-classrooms-distinctly-mine/ and here is one line of it (not more, because the post is short):

    Mistakes. Both my students and I make tons of them (who doesn’t, anyway?).

  30. I’m Chris Smith, (@aap03102 on Twitter) and you can find my blog for Mission 1 on my Pi-Wire blog (http://piwire.co.uk/2013/10/the-mathtwitterblogosphere/). I don’t want to be left behind with all the superb blog action that’s happening but I’m also a bit old school in that I already send out a weekly Maths Newsletter by email. Not trendy, I know. But, that’s me.

  31. My name is Odena LaFreniere and I’m blogging at Learning Math is Messy. The title of my blogpost is “Who Am I and Why Am I Blogging?″ (http://learningmathismessy.wordpress.com/).

    To whet your appetite: Learn a little bit about me and why I am starting to blog. Plus, find out my favorite activity to do with algebra 1 students.

    • HI Odena!
      I’ve been collecting Barbies to do this activity with my classes too! I guess I should ask for some clothes as they’re all naked… I was interested in the different types of classes you are teaching! What is your class of 5? Also, would you like to share the worksheets you made for your classes? (Always trying to not recreate the wheel!) Thanks for blogging!

      • Thank you so much for replying. As I start this blogging, I will always try to share worksheets. I use a lot of worksheets made by kutasoftware. This year I hope not to have to make so many because we are using Carnegie. At the same time, the Carnegie materials are very challenging for most of my students so I have to find ways to scaffold it so that it is accessible for them. I will post whatever I do. 🙂

        The class of 5 is not technically a special education class, but is is composed of five special education students. It just worked in the schedule to have them together in my class because they are in a language program for 3 classes of the day and we couldn’t find a way to separate them for math. One of the students has Down’s Syndrome and is learning how to count and add simple numbers. She has a para who mainly works with her. The other students are no where near grade level, but we try to teach a parallel curriculum to them so that they are learning what the other students are learning- just at a simpler level.

  32. Hi All! I’m Leah Segal
    @elbee818
    My blog is called Segal180 – it’s a 180 blog started this year where I write each day about my Algebra and Physics classes.
    http://segal180.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/explore-mtbos-mission-1/
    “My candidness and willingness to share some of my process and experience with the students is an important part of my classroom. The message: I’m not perfect at this but I’m working hard to improve. That’s also what I expect from each of you.”

    • Hi Leah! I love how you let your students know you value their feedback, but they need to take some time to give it to you, it’s not going to turn in to a debate right now in class! I also like how you are teaching them we’re not perfect, there’s always room to improve, and criticism should be constructive (I read this all from your post :).

  33. I’m Debbie Boden, @debboden on Twitter, and I blog at “Yes, but Why?” My first blog is Integers Need Some WORK, which can be found at http://debboden.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/integers-need-some-work/. In it you can find a link to the Progression for Teaching Integers packet I wrote (Dropbox link) and how we’ve been working so hard to teach new concepts, but have really succeeded in teaching students to memorize.

  34. Sarah Dulaney
    @sedulaney
    Go to Sleep. Study. Mathinate.
    MTBoS Mission #1
    http://mathinate.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/mtbos-mission-1/
    ” I like the activities because they remind everyone that it’s okay to make mistakes, because we learn from them, and that it’s important to persevere.”

  35. Ahoy hoy! My name is James Cleveland and I tweet at @jacehan. On my blog The Roots of the Equation, I just posted my Set Building Game (http://rootsoftheequation.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/set-building-game/)

    — Often students would give sentences that weren’t quite precise enough, so I (and later other students in the class) would push back. “Wait! China is a girl’s name and a location.” “Okay, so we’ll add ‘AND x is not Asian.” —

  36. John Golden, @mathhombre: http://mathhombre.blogspot.com/2013/10/explore-mtbos-what-makes-it-my-classroom.html
    I wrote about what makes my classroom mine. After passing over silliness and tech, I chose (c) choice.

  37. Cononiah Watson

    Hi all. I’m C. Watson, you can follow me on twitter at @MsC_Watson, my blog name is “Tales of a First Year, Middle School Math Teacher.” The title of the post is “MathTwitterBlogosphere.” You can find it at http://mscwatson.blogspot.com/2013/10/mathtwitterblogosphere-mtbos.html .

    Here’s a snippet of the post: “Also, I have One Direction fans in my class. This was evidenced by the sidewalk chalk. (I’m not a Directioner. At all. By any means.) Now, since we’ve done it a few times, I (along with the class) have gotten the hang of it.”

  38. Robin Nehila
    Radical_Robin
    Flip!Learn!Share!
    Who Won the Contest?
    http://fliplearnshare.blogspot.com/2013/10/who-won-contest.html
    At the end of the year, I share with my kids how I combine my hobby and love of math. They will figure out the placements of a bodybuilding competition to find out who won.

  39. My name is Val Barsevich and I am a sixth grade math teacher. I am new to the blogosphere and have been voraciously reading about all the new math practices that will take my students to deeper understanding. I so admire so many of you – you are inspiring me to grow in new ways after 33 years of teaching.

    I have been making more attempts to developing (or borrowing…) rich tasks. My blog has some of my attempts. One of the latest involves tennis balls and desks.

    http://sixthgrademathdodge.blogspot.com/2013/09/real-life-math.html

    I look forward to lots of learning with you all!

  40. My name is Sam Shah, and my blog is _Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere_. The blogpost is titled “Start Calculus with Area Functions” and can be found http://samjshah.com/2013/10/07/starting-calculus-with-area-functions/

    Here’s a snippet: “So I decided to try a new beginning to (non-AP) calculus this year. Instead of doing an algebra bootcamp and diving into limits, I decided to teach kids a new kind of function transformation.”

  41. My name is Kristina Patel and I’m blogging at _Irrational Love of Teaching_. The title of my blogpost is “How I Started Teaching and How I Found the MTBoS″ (http://irrationalloveofteaching.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/how-i-started-teaching-and-how-i-found-the-mtbos/)

    Preview— “Getting to know the individuals in my classroom drives me each day- what is the best way for each of them to be successful in math?”

  42. Amy McNabb
    @amcnabb3
    1ntegration by Parts
    Fun with Games & Puzzles
    http://1ntegrationbyparts.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/fun-with-games-and-puzzles/

    Snippet: “There are always those times when things don’t go according to plan. The day when the activity you thought would take all hour took 20 minutes, or your administration springs a surprise assembly on you. Then you’ve got the dreaded downtime dilemma – what can I do with these kids?”

  43. Kathryn
    @iisanumber
    iisanumber.blogspot.com
    A Favorite Problem
    http://iisanumber.blogspot.com/2013/10/mtbos-mission-1-favorite-problem.html

    “I think I first wrote this problem about three years ago when it was a completely bland word problem. For your comparison, I left that page as the third page of the document.”

  44. LeeAnn Zlomek
    @lazlomek on Twitter
    The Algebra Toolbox
    My Best Number
    http://lzlomek.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/my-best-number/

    First, I showed the students this 1:00 minute video clip from youtube to introduce the idea of the “best” number. (Use caution if you just search for Sheldon Coopers best number on youtube. One version explains Raj’s favorite number 5,318,008 because it spells boobies when you turn a calculator upside down!)

  45. Name: Jill Weitgenant
    Twitter: @jw12990
    Blog Name: Computer Geek & Math Nerd
    Post Title: Exploring the MTBoS Begins!
    URL: http://computergeekmathnerd.wordpress.com/
    “I want to become the best teacher I can be, and what better way than by learning from other math teachers?”

  46. Heather Kohn
    @heather_kohn
    Blog: http://growingexponentially.wordpress.com
    http://growingexponentially.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/traffic-jam-problem/

    One of my favorite rich tasks is the Traffic Jam Problem. The volume level in your classroom will increase as students express a mix of frustration and then excitement as they solve it!

  47. Kim Stichnote
    @KimStichnote
    Mrs. Stichnote’s Classroom
    MTBos Mission #1
    http://kstichnote.blogspot.com/2013/10/mtbos-mission-1.
    My room is a safe place for students to ask questions. I protect that at all costs.

  48. Hi, my name is Cindy Flim (@CGFlim) and my blog name is The Pizza Pi Girl.
    My post, My Introduction and a Big Thanks, is how I came to join and explore the MTBos.
    URL: http://cindyflim.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/my-introductio…d-a-big-thanks/

  49. My name is Clara Maxcy. I post under Cleargrace @the30thvoice
    My blog is called “One of Thirty Voices”, today’s post is titled “So let’s say a television is falling on your head. Will a bigger TV kill you faster?”
    The URL: http://the30thvoice.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/so-lets-say-a-television-is-falling-on-your-head-will-a-bigger-tv-kill-you-faster/

    You are standing on the sidewalk. Somebody yells, “watch out!” And you look up and realize a television is hurtling towards your head. You have 2 seconds to move out of the way. What floor was the television dropped from?

  50. My name is Adrienne Shlagbaum (@shlagteach) and I’m blogging at “Designing the Playbook”. The title of my blogpost is “A Classroom That’s Distinctly Mine: MTBoS Mission #1” (http://shlager.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/mtbos-mission-1/)

    “My classroom feels like a unique place for learning math, though it may be similar to others …It is nothing remarkable, extraordinary or spectacular, but it is also not the standard, expected, cookie-cutter lesson…it is ever-changing.”

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